Volunteer – Wild Futures

WILDFUTURE

WHAT WILL BE EXPECTED OF ME?

Volunteers spend every morning cleaning out the monkey enclosures, and during this time they will become familiar with the monkeys and their groups. At a certain point they will be taught how to make the food for the woolly monkeys, and will spend at least a couple of days being responsible for this whilst they are here. They may also make the food for the Capuchin monkeys. On as regular basis volunteers make enrichment items for the monkeys, and learn about what forms of enrichment are appropriate for each species of monkey. In the afternoons during summer they will do some work helping out in the café, some cleaning of public areas as well as assisting in running some activities and workshops for children who visit the sanctuary. During winter the afternoons are spent making enrichment, carrying out maintenance tasks like sawing wood, sweeping leaves and general housekeeping, or helping with displays, education resources or admin work. We do our best to take volunteers’ personal preferences into account where possible.

HOW LONG CAN I VOLUNTEER FOR?

2-5 weeks.

WHAT QUALIFICATIONS, IF ANY, DO I REQUIRE?

None, just the ability to perform physical work and enthusiasm for animal welfare.

WILL I NEED TO KNOW ANOTHER LANGUAGE?

English, spoken and comprehension to a working level.

HOW DO I GET TO YOUR LOCATION?

If you are travelling from overseas via London (Heathrow or Gatwick airports), trains to Liskeard can be taken from Paddington station (4-6 hours). Coaches to Liskeard can be picked up from either Victoria coach station in London or at both Heathrow and Gatwick airports (5-6 hours). The nearest towns to the sanctuary are Looe and Liskeard. Looe is a small fishing port 3 miles along the coast and Liskeard is 6 miles inland. National Express coaches and mainline trains stop at Liskeard. There is a local train from Liskeard to Looe, along a beautiful route through woodland and alongside an estuary, until about 6 pm. Taxis from Liskeard cost about £20. Taxis from Looe are about £12 (Looe Taxis 01503 262405).

ARE THERE ANY COSTS INVOLVED TO VOLUNTEER WITH ECUADOR ECO VOLUNTEER?

Click HERE to find out up to date costs and requirements for volunteering with WILD FUTURES.

WHAT TYPE OF ACCOMMODATION, MEALS AND FACILITIES CAN I EXPECT TO BE AVAILABLE TO ME?

A bunk bed in a shared, single-sex dormitory with up to 4 others, shared shower and bathroom, communal kitchen. There is food available to cook 3 meals a day for yourself, a few times a week a member of staff cooks dinner for everyone, and once a week all the volunteers cook together for everyone.

WHAT WILDLIFE SPECIES ARE THERE?

Woolly monkeys, Capuchin monkeys, Barbary macaques, Lesser Horseshoe bats, Pearl-bordered fritillary butterflies.

WHAT ATTRACTIONS CAN I EXPERIENCE DURING FREE-TIME?

Volunteers have 2 days off per week. The surrounding countryside is beautiful.

The Cornish Coast Path is nearby, with lovely views of the sea and a couple of local pubs. The nearby beach is also fairly easily reached. The Sanctuary is in a quiet rural area and can feel isolated especially if you don’t have a car. However, if you are prepared to walk, Looe and the nearby coastal villages of Seaton and Downderry are reached via the coast path within an hour. Buses to the city of Plymouth, 20 miles away, are available from all three.

Looe is a tourist town and fishing port. It is busy with holidaymakers in summer. Looe offers souvenir shops, cafes, restaurants, pubs and walks along the coast or riverside. Boat trips are available to destinations such as Polperro (picturesque harbour village), Fowey, Looe Island (nature reserve) or along the Looe River.

*During winter, not all these are available. During your stay you may have free internet access from the volunteer computer, and free wi-fi for laptops.

IN CONCLUSION

What is now Wild Futures’ Monkey Sanctuary was established in 1964. It was started as a refuge for ex-pet and ex-zoo woolly monkeys, many thousands of whom were exported to European zoos and pets shops. Many did not survive the journey. Most of those who did survive generally died after a short and unhappy life in captivity. All of the Woolly monkeys have been born at the Sanctuary but now has a non-breeding policy.  In the last few years the Sanctuary has begun to provide a home for other South American primates as well as Old World monkeys in need of better living conditions. Throughout the summer we are open to the public, and do our best to educate visitors about the dangers and welfare concerns associated with primates being kept as pets. We also campaign to end the primate pet trade at a legal level. We offer support and advice to overseas primate conservation organisations, do our best to conserve the native wildlife in and around our site in Cornwall, and provide a high standard of care to the monkeys who have been given a home for life here. We rely on the help of enthusiastic volunteers to achieve all of this, and welcome them into our home, hopefully giving an insight into a sustainable way of living, based on an awareness of the impact our actions and choices have on a global scale.

For more information on WILD FUTURES, please visit www.wildfutures.org

For important information on travelling overseas, please read ‘KNOW BEFORE YOU GO WILD!‘